Best Headphones For Guitar Amps in 2024

Rock your tunes without waking up the neighbors!
Niya Andrew • October 23, 2023

Top Pick

Best Overall

Audio-Technica ATH-M50xBT2

Audio-Technica ATH-M50xBT2
  • Excellent sound quality
  • Long Battery Life
  • Comfortable design
  • Foldability makes it portable
  • Multipoint pairing
  • Relatively pricey
  • Bulky design
  • No ANC feature

Premium Choice

Neumann NDH 30

Neumann NDH 30
  • Excellent sound quality
  • wide soundstage and accurate imaging
  • Relatively easy to drive
  • Durable build quality
  • Very comfortable to wear for longer time
  • Expensive
  • May experience some sound leakage

Pocket-Friendly

Austrian Audio HI-X15

Austrian Audio HI-X15
  • Well-built and durable
  • Relatively affordable
  • Lightweight and portable
  • Comfortable to wear for long periods of time
  • Excellent sound quality for the price
  • Neutral and balanced sound profile
  • Not very good isolating
  • Cable is not detachable
  • No in-line controls

Accurate Sound

Yamaha HPH-MT7

Yamaha HPH-MT7
  • Accurate and neutral sound reproduction
  • Wide frequency response (15Hz-25kHz)
  • Good isolation from external noise
  • Comfortable to wear for long periods of time
  • Affordable price
  • Non-detachable cable
  • Can be a bit tight on the head for some
  • Some reports of mechanical noise from the earcups

Spatial Imaging

Boss Waza-Air

Boss Waza-Air
  • Excellent sound quality
  • 3D soundstage
  • Built-in metronome, tuner, and effects library
  • Long battery life
  • Relatively pricier
  • No aux input
  • May produce a static noise at high volumes.

Value For Price

Tascam TH-02

Tascam TH-02
  • Good sound quality for the price:
  • Well-padded ear cups and headband.
  • Lightweight design
  • Offers value for price
  • Cheap build quality
  • Poor noise isolation
  • Short cable

Budget Option

Mackie MC-100

Mackie MC-100
  • Affordable pricing
  • Durable built quality
  • Comfortable fit
  • Versatile use
  • Good sound quality
  • Limited compatibility
  • Lack of customizations
  • Not for critical listening

Travel-Friendly

Vox VGH Rock

Vox VGH Rock
  • Excellent sound quality
  • Used for multiple purposes
  • Affordable price range
  • Plush earcups and headband
  • Limited battery life
  • No ANC feature

For Bass Guitar

SRH1540

SRH1540
  • Neutal and balanced response
  • Comfortable to wear for longer time
  • Excellent noise isolation
  • Durable build quality
  • Two detachable cables included
  • Relatively expensive
  • No ANC
  • No Bluetooth connectivity
  • No rotating earcups

Noise Isolation

Sennheiser HD 280

Sennheiser HD 280
  • Durable build quality
  • Good Sound quality
  • Affordable price range
  • Well padded headband
  • Offers value for money
  • Non-detachable cable
  • Tight fit

Every professional guitarist will confirm that the guitar amps sound best when cranked up to a volume eleven. But only so many guitarists can turn it to 11 in their living rooms. (Talk about being lucky!).

So naturally, you’ll need a decent pair of headphones if you can’t play the guitar at even moderate volumes, especially if you live in a quiet neighborhood.

We know no one’s got the time to go down to the market or surf the internet, swarming through hundreds of available options for headphones. So we did the grunt work for you. Being a guitarist myself, here is a list of headphones recommendations that would pair great with your guitar amplifiers or ‘amp’ if you’re cool.


The Best Guitar Amps Headphone for 2024

Audio-Technica ATH-M50xBT2 Headphones

Audio-Technica ATH-M50xBT2
Type: Wireless, Over-ear
Frequency Response: 15 Hz - 28 kHz
Impedance: 38 ohms
Driver type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 45 mm
Sensitivity: 99 dB/mW
Connection: Bluetooth 5.0

You’d find these headphones in most of our headphone recommendation articles like Best Closed-Back Headphones, Best Low-Frequency Headphones, Best Podcasting Headphones, and more, the main reason being their versatile functions, they would fit into almost any category, making them a worthwhile investment.

With a frequency range from 15Hz to 28kHz, this closed-back set from Audio-Technica is among the most sought-after studio-quality headphones on the market and is a popular choice for guitarists. They excel in transmitting natural, unaltered amp tones with minimal alterations to EQ and reaction time compared to standard wireless solutions.

The wired set has one apparent flaw: the cable often gets tangled and messy. But the Bluetooth model eliminates the only issue with M50x-wired.

My Verdict:

These are excellent headphones for any purpose involving a guitar, including recording, mixing, practicing, and listening to your favorite music.


1. Neumann NDH 30 Open-back Studio Headphones

Neumann NDH 30
Type: Open-back
Frequency Response: 12Hz-34kHz
Impedance: 120 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 38mm
Sensitivity: 104 dB SPL
Connection: 1/8" plug, 1/4" adapter

Neumann has a long and illustrious history in microphone production and studio monitoring. Listening to your guitar with the NDH 30 headphones will make you feel like you’re in a world-class recording studio. The exquisite steel spring and aluminum body provide the exact quality you’d expect from Neumann, giving them an air of superiority even at first glance.

These headphones have a massive frequency range of 12Hz to 34kHz, making them ideal for professional studio monitoring. However, they are not flattering and do not reflect your music as it sounds. If you like stereo effects, the NDH 30s are where you want to be since their open-back design offers a natural bass tone and truly makes the stereo field sing.

My Verdict:

If you’re serious about your sound and want to hear every nuance of your performance, look no further than the NDH 30, the gold standard of studio headphones.


2. Austrian Audio HI-X15

Austrian Audio HI-X15
Type: Over-ear, closed-back
Frequency Response: 12 Hz – 24 kHz
Impedance: 25 Ω
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 44mm
Sensitivity: 113 dBspl/V
Connection: 3.5mm (1/8”) with 1/4” (6.35mm) adapter

Austrian Audio is a relatively new company better known for its sound recording than its sound reproduction. Still, unlike many upstarts, its products rarely have noticeable growing pains. The company’s headphones follow this trend, especially the Hi-X15, a pair of studio-quality cans that will stay on the bank. The 44mm drivers are the highlight of these headphones because they deliver excellent transient response and distortion-free sounds without sacrificing bass.

These are an excellent choice if you enjoy playing or listening to your music for extended periods. Even though they don’t feature active noise cancellation, the headphones fit very securely over the ears and do an excellent job of blocking background noise, making them an excellent choice for recording acoustic guitar in a studio.

And look at how stylish these headphones are! Despite being reasonably priced, they have the look and feel of a high-end item.

My Verdict:

The Austrian Audio HI-X15 is an excellent choice for comfort, given its price. These headphones are the future of comfortable and affordable headphones for audiophiles cans.


3. Yamaha HPH-MT7 Headphones

Yamaha HPH-MT7
Type: Closed-back, circumaural (over-ear)
Frequency Response: 5 Hz - 40 kHz
Impedance: 37 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 40mm
Sensitivity: 100 dB SPL/mW
Connection: 3.5 mm (1/8") stereo with 6.3 mm (1/4") stereo adaptor

Yamaha NS10 studio monitors enjoy widespread acclaim due to their accurate middle and natural bass. Yamaha released these headphones 2015 to pair with such speakers; they provide high-resolution audio with pinpoint stereo imaging and accurate signal reproduction (from 15Hz to 25kHz).

Synthetic leather and oversized low-resistance cushions offer stress-free wearability and high isolation levels, while the three-dimensional arm pivot structure and adjustable slider length reduce strain during continuous use.

My Verdict:

The one potential drawback is that they may need to be more flat like the monitors modeled after.
On the other hand, if you’ve already found the ideal guitar tone, this is great for you!


4. Boss Waza-Air

Boss Waza-Air
Type: Over-ear headphones (Closed-Back)
Frequency Response: 20 Hz - 20 kHz
Impedance: 32 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 50mm
Sensitivity: 97 dB SPL/mW
Connection: 1/4" TRS phone type, USB Micro-B type (for charging)

The Boss Waza-Air headphones are like having an amp made of a Katana wrapped around your skull. You’ll experience a sensation that can’t be described until you turn your head while listening to your amplifier in a virtual environment and hear the sound shift as the spatial technology responds in real time.

This feature uses a gyro sensor to track the movement of the user’s head and adjust the sound accordingly, creating a more immersive and realistic playing experience.

The Waza-Air headphone’s static and stage modes also provide an eerily realistic experience, making it feel like you’re standing before an amplifier.

Wireless and equipped with their transmitter, they function like a separate gear. With a battery life of almost five hours on a full charge and a sound quality like this, it’s easy to see why you’d want to get the most out of the headphones.

My Verdict:

These headphones are costly but revolutionize how you approach guitar practice.


5. Tascam TH-02

Tascam TH-02
Type: Closed-back, Dynamic
Frequency Response: 18 Hz - 22 kHz
Impedance: 32 ohms
Driver Size: 50mm
Sensitivity: 98 dB ± 3 dB
Connection: 3.5 mm (1/8") TRS with 6.3 mm (1/4") TRS adapter

Tascam provides a low-price device that looks stylish and contemporary. The padded earcups can be turned in any direction by ninety degrees. Although the earpads and headgear appear to be stitched together securely, and the fabric allows for little wiggle room, they may eventually wear out with heavy use.

The Tascam headphones are reasonably long-lasting despite being constructed from less-than-premium polymers. They may be easily stored and transported in their folded state.

The lows, mids, and highs are all surprisingly good for the price. Tascam may now be compared favorably to other similarly priced devices. The bass is buried deep in the background, but the sound is pleasant. When used in a recording studio or when playing an instrument, they help provide a more even tone quality.

My Verdict:

This is the most incredible option for a first set of headphones for guitar practice. You will be satisfied with the quality of these headphones for the price.


6. Mackie MC-100

Mackie MC-100
Type: Closed-back, circumaural (over-ear)
Frequency Response: 15 Hz - 20 kHz
Impedance: 32 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 40 mm
Sensitivity: 95 dB SPL/mW
Connection: 3.5 mm (1/8") stereo with 6.3 mm (1/4") stereo adaptor

When worn, the MC-100’s materials and construction proved to be rather pleasant. The adjustable headband is padded well but clasped too tightly at first. They were comfortable to wear once I had broken them in.

The soundproofing is good but needs to be top-notch. We did a test and found that we could still hear some ambient noise, but it was tolerable for guitar practice.

For us, the most notable part of the system was the bespoke 40mm drivers. They feature a solid low end and a detailed midrange but muddy highs. These headphones covered the spectrum from 15 Hz to 20 kHz, making them versatile, although they lacked the harmonics seen in other sets.

Their longevity is an issue. The material could be more durable, and the earpads easily tear. If the earpads ever get worn out, it’s simple to swap them out.

My Verdict:

The Mackie MC-100 is our most comfortable low-cost studio headphones. They could be more bright and muddy, and their sound is good enough for guitar practice.


7. Vox VGH Rock

Vox VGH Rock
Type: Closed-back
Frequency Response: 20 Hz - 20 kHz
Impedance: 49 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 40 mm
Sensitivity: 97 dB SPL/mW
Connection: 6.3 mm (1/4") stereo input, 3.5 mm (1/8") stereo AUX IN

The Vox VGH is compact and lightweight; we can carry it around in a backpack without problems. The long cable terminates in a quarter-inch jack, connecting you directly to your guitar’s amplifier. There’s also an auxiliary input to plug in our phone and jam to a prerecorded track.

The ear cups were small, and the padding seemed thin, so they would not be ideal for lengthy practice periods. After 30 minutes of use, we experienced no discomfort, and the headphones effectively blocked outside sounds. But the sound could be more detailed and expansive than other headphones we’ve tried.

The VGH Rock’s ability to produce authentic crunch tones was a big selling point. Three distinct amplifier settings include built-in effects like delay and chorus. The headphones feature knobs that can be used to adjust the various effects.

Battery operation eliminates the requirement for wall sockets. You’re ready to put your headphones into the guitar’s headphone jack. We appreciated the easy setup, which allowed spontaneous jam sessions at any time and place. We got 14 or 15 hours of use out of the three AAA batteries recommended.

My Verdict:

The Vox VGH Rock is an outstanding set of headphones you can use as a guitar amplifier. Although it provides only average comfort, the low price makes it a worthwhile experiment.


8. SRH1540

SRH1540
Type: Closed-back, Over-ear
Frequency Response: 5 Hz to 25 kHz
Impedance: 46 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 40 mm
Sensitivity: 99 dB SPL/mW
Connection: 3.5 mm (1/8") stereo with 6.35 mm (1/4") threaded adapter

You should get a pair of Shure headphones to hear all the intricacies and depth in your bass guitar’s tone.

We like that they are closed-back, giving bass players more control over their performance.

While open-back headphones are our preference, closed-back models block out ambient noise and let you hear every detail of your music.

If you’re a bass player who often puts in long hours at the office, you’ll appreciate the comfort of these headphones’ memory foam earpads and the fact that they weigh less than a pound. Put some pillows over your ears, which will have the same effect.

My Verdict:

They’re great for use in the studio and during rehearsals, and their plush earpads make it much more convenient for users to wear them through long studio sessions, too.


9. Sennheiser HD 280

Sennheiser HD 280
Type: Closed-back, Over-ear
Frequency Response: 8 Hz - 25 kHz
Impedance: 64 ohms
Driver Type: Dynamic
Driver Size: 40mm
Sensitivity: 113 dB SPL/mW
Connection: 3.5 mm (1/8") stereo with 6.3 mm (1/4") stereo adaptor

When it comes to top-tier studio headphones, Sennheiser and Audio-Technica are in a virtual dead heat.
Regarding transient response, the HD 280 headphones stand out as very attractive.

Like the Audio-Technica headphones, these have an extensive frequency response. They range from 8 Hz to 25 kHz, slightly lower but less high. Though helpful in keeping tabs, guitarists don’t need to work at such low frequencies regularly.

While it won’t drastically alter your guitar’s natural tone, pedals can make your bass end sound muffled.

My Verdict:

Though these may not be our favorite, it’s still worth admitting that these headphones are the comfiest ones we’ve tested in this review list. One perk is that they are lighter in weight, which makes them easy to carry around or wear around the neck all day.


Tips for Buying Quality Guitar Headphones:

Choosing headphones without first trying them on is difficult, as everyone has different tastes in terms of sound quality, comfort, and other factors. There’s a wide range of pricing and models; here are some considerations.

Sound Quality and Frequency Response:

The headphones a guitarist uses must be compatible with the distortion and effects of their guitar amp. Studio headphones are ideal for this purpose, as most other headphones fall short. You’ll need a balanced frequency response with a clear midrange so that your guitar sound stands out in a mix. A flat sound allows you to hear tones accurately, improving your ability to make them.

But how flat you want the sound to be and whether you prefer a particular character depends entirely on your ears. A flat signature will be better if you’re also planning to mix and produce songs with these same headphones. But if you’re only practicing and monitoring, headphones with a slight ‘V’ character (but not too much) can be easier to listen to without being too sharp.

Driver size affects the overall loudness of the headphones but doesn’t directly affect sound quality. The drivers’ build quality and substance are more telling.

Finally, the Boss Waza-Air and the Vox VGH are only two examples of headphones with amplifiers on our list. If you’re considering such a device, be sure the built-in ones are to your liking before making a purchase. If not, consider pairing a second amplifier with an additional pair of headphones.

Design and Transmission:

Design is another crucial factor to think about. The headphones’ good looks, as well as their durability and toughness, benefit from this feature. While some are compact enough to throw in a bag, others may be more delicate and need to be handled with care. You have the option of purchasing a wired or wireless set of headphones.

As for acoustics, you’ll likely need sound noise isolation with a closed-back design for recording guitar more accurately. You’ll want headphones with minimal bleeding to avoid disturbing those around you while you practice in silence.

Level of Comfort:

Even the highest sound quality will only save them if they are comfortable to wear for extended periods. In our experience, circumaural headphones (around-the-ear) with good padding are the best for guitarists as they’re comfortable and offer sound noise isolation.

The earpads’ width should be adequate for comfort but not so much that the headphones don’t fit your ears snugly, and the sound quality could be better. So comfort is subjective, even more so than the sonic character of the headphones, and it may need some experimentation to find the right fit. The frequency response may be altered if the pads are replaced.

Frequently Asked Questions About Headphones For Guitar Amp:

What kind of headphones do you need for a guitar amp?

If your guitar amp has a headphone jack, you can use any pair of headphones with it. Before buying a pair of guitar amp headphones, it is advisable to check first because only some amps include one.

Can you listen to a guitar amp with headphones?

While some amps sound fantastic when using headphones, some don’t quite cut it. Newer modeling amps sound great with a set of cans on, but an older solid-state amp we used a few years back sounded pretty bubbly and uninspired.

Can I use Bluetooth headphones with a guitar amp?

Bluetooth headphones can be used with guitar amplifiers. However, Bluetooth’s weak signal strength could compromise the quality of the music. If you’re serious about getting the best possible sound quality out of your guitar, we recommend you use a wired connection.

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